Apr 202012
 

Governments and business everywhere live in a state of tension. Neither behaves exactly as the other would wish. They have different agendas and different ways of meeting their goals. They need each other, but mostly don’t like each other.

In some countries, they do work reasonably well together. Some governments do try hard to create a business-friendly environment. But more often, the relationship is an uneasy one.

When a prominent business leader speaks out against his government—and more so in a country like South Africa, still struggling to escape its past, and where politicians are prickly and many are socialist or harbor deep anti-business feelings—he needs to think carefully about what will follow. The outcome is unlikely to be what he wishes for. The response from those he’s criticized will be defensive and angry. His peers in business will duck for cover. His own business may be negatively affected.

This is exactly what we now see unfolding in the drama between Reuel Khoza, non-executive chairman of Nedbank, and the ANC-led government of South Africa.

Khoza lit the match with this comment in his chairman’s statement in Nedbank’s latest (2011) annual report:

“UPHOLDING OUR CONSTITUTION

“SA is widely recognised for its liberal and enlightened constitution, yet we observe the emergence of a strange breed of leaders who are determined to undermine the rule of law and override the constitution. Our political leadership’s moral quotient is degenerating and we are fast losing the checks and balances that are necessary to prevent a recurrence of the past. This is not the accountable democracy for which generations suffered and fought.

“The integrity, health, socioeconomic soundness and prosperity of SA is the collective responsibility of all citizens, corporate or individual. We have a duty to build and develop this nation and to call to book the putative leaders who, due to sheer incapacity to deal with the complexity of 21st century governance and leadership, cannot lead.

“We have a duty to insist on strict adherence to the institutional forms that underpin our young democracy.”

The ANC/government immediately struck back at Khoza. The attacks—labelled in the media as “boorish,” “hypersentive,” “paranoid,” “personal,” “inappropriate,” and “illogical”—ensured that the matter got wide publicity, and may have done more damage to SA than anything he’d said. Various commentators called for open and polite discussion of the issues he’d raised. Khoza visited the ANC’s headquarters to discuss the matter, and the movement issued a statement afterward, saying:

“We are happy that this interaction took part in a cordial atmosphere and was fruitful.

“The meeting resolved what was perceived as a stand-off and addressed a variety of issues related to governance and business leadership.

“We are encouraged that a variety of options in terms of engagement were considered. The meeting resolved that there will be more meaningful interaction between the two parties in future.”

OK. And what now? What might “more meaningful interaction” mean? Is all forgiven? Has Khoza’s message been given short shrift or taken to heart?

Will there be further chats…or actual changes of leadership…more careful recruitment of future leaders…leadership development programs…? Is Khoza now going to back down and pretend he didn’t really mean what he said? Or will he repeat it the next time some journalist asks him if he was serious? How will he deal with questions about this matter that will surely be lobbed at him when next he speaks at a conference?

While all this was happening, Garth Griffin, outgoing chairman of Absa, wrote in his own bank’s annual report that SA needed less talk, more action. Then Nicky Newton-King, CEO of the Johannesburg Securities exchange (JSE), told the Cape Town Press Club that investors wanted certainty from markets, but Khoza’s views reflected uncertainty about the direction of South Africa’s policies.

Some people saw these as signs that “business” was starting to speak out, and hoped for more.  But that’s not been the case.

While there were murmurs from the corporate sector about government being wrong to expect business to stick to business and stay out of politics, hardly anyone said Khoza was right. That was left to “outsiders” like Institute of Race Relations CEO John Kane-Berman, the indomitable Business Day letter writer, Dr Lucas Ntyintyane, and the CEO of the SA Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Massmart CEO Grant Pattison saw Khoza’s comment as having hit a nerve because it was “too close to the truth.” But when the Sunday Times sought comment from other captains of industry, most became unavailable or refused to speak.

Corporate SA has once again been cowed.

SO WHAT EXACTLY HAS BEEN ACHIEVED?

Reuel Khoza was brave to do what he did. He stuck his head above the parapet to say what many other people think. Nick Binedell, dean of the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS) said he was “a bit provocative” but “should be commended for getting the debate out in the open.”

The political climate in SA has soured badly in recent years. The national conversation has become toxic, uncivil and destructive—and will get more so in the months ahead of the ANC’s December policy conference at Mangaung, as power struggles intensify. Politicians and bureaucrats worldwide get slammed for their behavior, but ours are drawing more and more negative attention.

Relations between government and business have never been good since the 1994 transition, and are marked by mutual suspicion and distrust. While government struggles to deliver on its mandate, and desperately needs business investment and assistance, too many of its policies, actions, and words add up to a different message and have the opposite effect.

One objective of the Nedbank Group strategy is, “Becoming the public sector bank of choice.” But the threat has been made that the ANC might need to review its dealings with the bank, and with ANC cadres so firmly entrenched across the public sector, this doesn’t even need to become a formal position to have some impact.

Nedbank also aims to become the leader in business banking, and its retail unit has been performing well. But again, in both of these areas, ANC supporters may be turned off by Khoza’s criticism.

Although he opened his chairman’s statement by emphasizing the importance of sound corporate governance, Khoza then waded into risky territory—in the name of his company. Strange, given that one of Nedbank’s “Deep green aspirations” is to be “worldclass at managing risk.” And that in the risk management review in the annual report, it states:

“Nedbank Group has a strong risk culture and follows worldclass enterprisewide risk management, which aligns strategy, policies, people, processes, technology and business intelligence in order to evaluate, manage and optimise the opportunities, threats and uncertainties the group may face in its ongoing efforts to maximise sustainable shareholder value.”

So what risks has Khoza exposed the bank to? Did Old Mutual, Nedbank’s parent, know this was coming—and what was their view about it? Did Nedbank’s board have advance warning—and what inputs did the members make? Who else in the bank saw the statement before it was published?

QUESTIONS FOR THE FUTURE

Past experience has shown the ANC/government to be extremely sensitive to business statements it doesn’t like. So if one thing was guaranteed in this case, it was that the response to Khoza’s opinion would not be calm, respectful, or kind. He pulled no punches, and the fact that he had been close to the Mbeki administration was probably an added irritant.

However, some of the country’s political leaders may think carefully about what he said, and may even try to change their ways and try to get people around them to change, too.

South Africa badly needs all hands on deck, and government and business to work together to create the much vaunted “better life for all.” Now, that is either much more or much less likely. Much depends on whether government is able to tone down its anti-business signals, convince business that it really does value it, and do whatever is needed to make SA a good place to do business. Without that context, business will always be reluctant to invest, create jobs, or contribute in all the other ways that it can.

So here we have an interesting case study for business leaders—and for business schools. With some difficult questions:

  1. What should characterize the relationship between government and business?
  2. How freely and openly should business speak about national affairs?
  3. Should business leaders speak out personally, and under the banner of their firms, or should they leave comment to the organizations that represent them (chambers of commerce, Business Unity South Africa, the Black Business Council, the Black Management Forum, etc.)?
  4. Should they engage publicly with government about contentious matters, or should they do it behind closed doors?
  5. How should companies evaluate the risks of making statements critical of government?
  6. How should they manage the flak that flies when things go badly?

We live in testing, touchy times. Creating a “burning platform” might be the only way to get some things done, but it can also take you down. This saga could have a happy ending. It would be a pity if it ended in tears.

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  •  20/04/2012
Apr 082012
 

The market shares of South Africa’s four big banks—Standard Bank, Absa, First National Bank, and Nedbank—go up and down, but with few big swings. Despite government pressure to do more for the bottom end of the market, and some stabs at doing so, all have continued to focus on their traditional middle- to upper-end customers. That, they’ve held, is where the money is.

And it’s true, that’s where the money was. But growth in that sector has slowed. Profits are under pressure. So the giants been forced to look downmarket, where there are an estimated 8 million “unbanked” and “unsecured” customers, and plenty of growth to come.

The fight will be brutal. They’re all charging into the same arena at the same time, so they’re tripping over each other. The big banks have clout, and are deadly serious about this new venture. But they’re stepping onto the home turf of two smaller banks—African Bank and Capitec—which know how to fight there.

These two operate in different niches. They’ve been growing fast, and extending their presence into new areas with appealing offerings. They’re also solidly established, and far from rolling over under the current onslaught, they now have no choice but to become even smarter and more aggressive.

The bigger of them, African Bank, hardly advertises at all, but has many years of hard-earned experience at the lower end of the market, a sophisticated approach to credit management, almost 16,000 highly motivated people, and a large pool of customers who are real fans and not just locked-in by some gimmick.

Capitec is a younger business, but its promise of simpler, cheaper, and more convenient banking has strong appeal. After initially aiming at poorer black customers, it’s now opening branches in wealthy areas and attracting whites, professionals, and suburban housewives.

There’s a classic disruption strategy at work here, as described by Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen:

  1. Incumbent firms keep improving what they’ve been doing, assuming they’ll keep customers happy by doing more of the same better.  But they do lots of stuff customers don’t care about. As they add more and more bells and whistles, their costs rise and they create a “price umbrella” for upstarts.
  2. One or more newcomers sneak in under that umbrella. They focus on customers the dominant firms have overlooked or underserved, with products tailored precisely for “the job they want done.” Unencumbered by entrenched mindsets and legacy policies, practices, and infrastructure, they’re able to keep costs and prices low. They go unnoticed while they fine-tune their processes and build awareness, capabilities, experience, and muscle.
  3. Stuck with a price disadvantage and lots of baggage, the big players struggle to move downmarket. At the same time, the disruptors start moving upwards, to pick off their customers.

The current process has a way to go. The latest phase in the banking war illustrates just how hard it is to stand out in the marketplace today—and why “sustainable advantage” is for more and more companies an impossible dream. It highlights the importance of delivering a “difference” that really is different, but also that matters to customers so they’ll pay for it.

THE DELIBERATE DESTRUCTION OF DIFFERENCE

Virtually in unison, the big guys have announced a flurry of new products and services (or re-promoted existing ones), and started to move downmarket. They’re hoping for the best of several worlds: to keep customers they’ve got, while also stealing some from each other—and to snatch business from African Bank and Capitec, while also luring unbanked customers in that territory.

Since March, print media have been stuffed with one page of ads after another extolling the promises of three of the Big Four: Absa, Standard Bank, and First National Bank.

Absa promises “Better banking”:

IMMEDIATE PAYMENTS…STAMPED BANK STATEMENTS…APPLY ONLINE…SCAN AND PAY…SEND CASH AROUND THE WORLD…FREE eSTATEMENTS…CELLPHONE BANKING…CASH ACCEPTING ATMs…UNIT TRUSTS ONLINE…OPEN ACCOUNTS ONLINE…OVER 8 000 ATMs AND 900 BRANCHES…RECHARGE WITHOUT CHARGE…LOW-COST BANKING…REAL BUYING POWER…REAL CASH REWARDS…

Turn the page, and there’s Standard Bank “Moving forward:

THE CONVENIENCE OF 18 450 PLACES YOU CAN DO YOUR BANKING…HELPING CUSTOMERS SAVE UP TO 50%…ELITE BANKING COSTS R99.00 A MONTH…YOUTH…STUDENT ACHIEVER…GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL BANKING…ACHIEVER ELECTRONIC…PRESTIGE BANKING…PRIVATE BANKING…

And without a gap, you get First National Bank, answering its “How can we help you?” slogan with its own laundry list of promises, and its claim to be the industry innovator:

INNOVATION…VALUE…PAY2CELL…KRUGERRANDS…ONLINE FOREX…FNB LIFE COVER…SLOW LOUNGE…eBUCKS…SELF-SERVICE BANKING…INCONTACT…INSTANT ACCOUNTING…FNB BANKING APP…SHARE INVESTING…FUEL REWARDS…MULTICURRENCY ACCOUNTS…eWALLET…TABLET & SMARTPHONE OFFER…

Now, as a customer, what do you make all of this? What’s the difference—or is there really any difference? What does it mean to you? Are you impressed by this growing range of offerings? Or overwhelmed? Or perhaps you just don’t care.

The South African banking industry ranks among the healthiest in the world—thanks to tough regulation. But banks have long been accused of over-charging, lousy service, and bullying tactics. Nobody I know is excited about dealing with their bank. Nobody has ever recommended their bank to me.

As a customer myself, I have absolutely no idea what sets banks apart. I deal with them because I need to, not because I want to. They make a lot of noise, but I can’t hear what they say.

Bank strategists would do well to pay close attention to Beating The Commodity Trap by strategy professor Richard D’Aveni of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. Because that’s exactly the trap they’re creating for themselves—at huge cost, and despite their desperate efforts.

Describing why firms get into a commodity trap, D’Aveni writes:

“…the reasons most companies find themselves in the trap in the first place is because they failed to innovate early enough to avoid it or they later differentiated and cut prices so much that they have exacerbated the trap.”

They’d also to well to heed to these words of Harvard Business School professor Youngme Moon in her excellent book Different:

“Competition and conformity will always be fraternally linked, for the simple reason that a race can only be run if everyone is facing the same direction.”

“…the way to think about differentiation is not as the offspring of competition, but as an escape from competition altogether.”

“There is a kind of difference that says nothing, and there is a kind of difference that speaks volumes.”

Making a “difference that speaks volumes” has always been a challenge to companies and their ad agencies. It’s getting harder as competitors crowd into a field, and as they watch and learn from each other, benchmark themselves against each other, recruit people from each other, attend the same industry events, read the same publications, buy from the same suppliers, and so on. They strive to be different, but do everything possible to look alike.

First National Bank has seized an advantage by not just re-segmenting the market, but by using product innovation as its differentiator and a character called “Steve” to grab attention in broadcast media. But how long will it be before others do the same? Technology constraints might slow some of its competitors down, but they’re sure to fix that. So the rapid reinvention of business models will continue. Future ad campaigns will surely become both more factual and more emotional.

If experience from other industries is anything to go by, the banks have started what could be a costly “race to the bottom” (and not just the bottom of the market). Together, they’re transforming their world. The best they can hope for is that none of them does anything really silly, and that the market stays reasonably stable. They also need to hope that their efforts don’t create a credit bubble and provoke their regulator to clamp down on them.

Whichever way things go, we’re about to see:

  • What difference strategy can make, vs. the importance of being able to think on your feet, change direction in a blink, and run faster than your enemies.
  • How important real product innovation is vs. vaguer corporate branding.
  • Whether conventional forces can take on guerrilla fighters and win, and what it takes.
  • How guerrillas can withstand an onslaught from multiple well-armed attackers.

There will be important lessons here for all managers, so  this is a battle worth watching closely. (More on this in a coming post.)

 Capitec and African Bank have given the South African banking industry a long-overdue wake-up. Now, watch the shake-up.

 

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Apr 042012
 

When Samsung announced in mid-2010 that to grow its business in Africa, it would design products specifically for Africa, it confirmed two facts about global competition today:

  1. As growth in developed markets gets more difficult, firms must seek and exploit opportunities in developing markets.
  2. To succeed there, they need to “act local.”

Explaining Samsung’s plan, George Ferreira, COO of Samsung Electronics SA, said:

“In line with our key value of co-prosperity, coupled with our business and development sector partnerships, we have a vision of developing technology that is built in Africa, for Africa, by Africa”…We will over the next few years be allocating more local R&D investment for further local product planning, design and development.”

A press release from the company added:

“Samsung have undertaken extensive research and development (R&D) to develop technology innovations, specific to the African consumers’ needs. These include, TVs with built in power surge protectors, triple protector technology for air conditioners to ensure durability, power surge protection and safeguarding against high temperatures and humidity, deep foam washing machines that are 70% energy efficient – saving up to 30% water use, dura-cool refrigerators with cool pack – allowing the refrigerators to stay cool without power, as well as dual-sim technology and long battery life phones with battery standby times of up to 25 days.”

According to a report on Moneyweb, “The electronics group hopes to attract the African market with a range of television and refrigeration products that are designed to withstand power surges, dust particles and humidity and camera and camcorders that are designed to take “better” pictures of dark toned people.”

In one example of how it will pursue its strategy, Samsung has teamed up with the University of Cape Town (UCT) in South Africa and Strathmore University in Kenya to develop unique mobile phone applications for Africa. Such collaboration is sure to yield ideas that the company wouldn’t develop on its own, and to speed up the time-to-market process.

However, what the electronics giant did not say was that innovations in developing markets may prove valuable in developed markets (a process known as “reverse innovation” or “frugal innovation”). This has been the experience of companies producing products as diverse as soap, tractors, and medical scanners. And innovations may include not just new products, but also processes and business models.

Innovations from developing markets give firms new opportunities in developed markets by providing simpler, cheaper products

Reverse innovation will be one of the most important trends of coming years. It opens many new opportunities for developing markets and for the companies and innovators in them. And it provides new reasons to go to places you weren’t really sold on, to invest there, and to make a deliberate effort to learn whatever you can from being there.

Champion of the movement is V.J. Govindarajan, professor of international business at Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, and the first professor in residence and chief innovation consultant at General Electric. His October 2009 Harvard Business Review article, “How GE is disrupting itself,” co-authored with GE chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt and Chris Trimble, another Tuck faculty member, won the McKinsey Award. His new book, Reverse Innovation (co-authored again with Trimble), will probably draw similar praise—and stoke interest in the concept. They provide many examples of how firms have gone about it, plus advice for those who want to.

In an interview with [email protected] (April 2, 2012), Govindarajan explained some of the rationale behind the concept:

The fundamental driver of reverse innovation is the income gap that exists between emerging markets and the developed countries. The per capita income of India, for instance, is about US$3,000, whereas it is about $50,000 in the U.S. There is no way to design a product for the American mass market and then simply adapt it and hope to capture middle India. You need to innovate for India, not simply export to India. Buyers in poor countries demand solutions on an entirely different price-performance curve. They demand new, high-tech solutions that deliver ultra-low costs and “good enough” quality.”

“Poor countries will become R&D labs for breakthrough innovations in diverse fields as housing, transportation, energy, health care, entertainment, telecommunications, financial services, clean water and many more.

Reverse innovation has the potential to transform wealth in the world. Growth in developed countries has slowed down. Much of the growth is now in developing countries. The 2008 financial crisis and the more recent debt crisis [in Europe] have only exacerbated this situation. As such, we are likely to see the center of gravity for innovation shifting from rich to poor countries.”

Questions to ask now:

  • What will developing countries do to promote not just their market opportunities, but also their innovation opportunities?
  • What will local firms in those countries do to take advantage of this trend?
  • How will local universities and other potential partners respond?
  • How can you exploit this idea?

The entire world is a learning laboratory. No place has a monopoly on ideas. Today, it’s foolish—and potentially costly and risky as well—to be myopic.

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  •  04/04/2012
Feb 282012
 

Like many other countries today, South Africa has an awful unemployment problem. But ours is not a new problem. For too long it has simply been denied, and only recently has it become a “big issue.” Now, there’s panic in the land.

As other countries are discovering, disaffected young people who have no hope are extremely dangerous. So it’s in everyone’s interests to do everything possible to deal with the matter. Government must play a key role, not just in employing people and providing a welfare net for those who don’t find jobs, but also in creating a policy and regulatory environment that makes hiring people a good idea. And business, naturally, has a huge part to play too.

Here is a speech I made at a graduation ceremony at the University of Johannesburg on September 29, 2009, which, hopefully, will trigger some reflection … and action.

 

Tony Manning

Graduation Address

University of Johannesburg 

September 29, 2009

Good afternoon, and thank you for inviting me to be here today.

Let me begin by congratulating you on your achievement. I can only imagine the hard work and sacrifice that has brought you to this graduation. I’m very proud to be part of your celebration.

Obviously, when you invite someone to talk at an event like this, you expect them to tell you something interesting or useful or entertaining. But I’d like to start by asking you a question. One that I hope you’ll think hard about in days and weeks to come.

The question is this: what are you going to do to make a difference in this world?

It’s especially important to ask that right now, for the world is in a delicate and dangerous state.

A year ago, Lehmann Brothers collapsed, and the global financial system went into meltdown. Research by some economists shows that on many indicators, the crisis we’re still working through is worse than the Great Depression 60 years ago.

There are massive challenges ahead. As Jeffrey Immelt, the chairman of General Electric has said, this a time of “reset” in which organizations, institutions, systems, processes and values are being turned on their heads. Ideas and deeply-held beliefs about everything from capitalism to climate change, from consumerism to corporate governance—and yes, business education too—are all under the microscope.

But I’d like to focus on just one issue.

Exactly five years ago, in September of 2004, I wrote an article in Business Day headlined, “What if unemployment can’t be fixed?” The former editor of a major newspaper suggested in a letter to the paper that I was being racist—the same tactic now used so quickly when someone doesn’t like what you say.

But consider where we are now.

Some jobs were created as growth improved after 1994. But there weren’t enough of them, given the increase in population, to soak up the new job seekers. So while the unemployment level came down, it remained stubbornly high.

When ASGISA was announced with much fanfare in February 2006, the intention was to light a fuse under the economy in order to halve poverty and unemployment by 2014. And for a brief moment, we happily rode the wave of an international economic super-cycle that was like nothing anyone had seen before.

But then, along with just about everyone else’s, our economy dived from strong positive growth into negative territory. And right now, we’re bumping along, with many things just getting less worse rather than really better.

Even as pressures grow for government to add to an already long list of things to do and expensive promises to meet, Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan warns that the tax take is in a nosedive and the budget deficit is rising fast. Economists see growth in the next few years hovering at perhaps 3% to 4% rather than the 6%-plus ASGISA goal.

This year, anywhere from 250 000 to 475 000 jobs have been lost, depending on which survey you use. And while there is now quite a lot of chatter about “green shoots” of recovery, there are also worrying signs that when it does come, it’s likely to be weaker than we’d wish.

Globally, massive long-term unemployment will plague societies for years. Add this burden to exploding government debt, weak consumer spending, and massive overcapacity in many industries, and there’s a very good prospect of a recovery that’s not V-shaped or U-shaped, but W-shaped – in other words, some short-term good news followed by another sharp slump.

For many years, I have made the point in books and speeches that manufacturing will never be the job-creation miracle it was expected to be. So it’s no surprise that we now hear Ebrahim Patel, the Minister of Economic Development, warning that this country could become de-industrialised. That risk will grow as aggressive foreign companies appear on our doorstep and chase after our local customers in their efforts to recover from this recession.  It really is a dog-eat dog world, and the fight will be deadly.

Other sectors of the South African economy—tourism and commodity exports particularly—will take up some of the slack. Infrastructure spending is a timely boon. The FIFA 2010 Football World Cup will undoubtedly give us a boost. But the harsh fact is that in this knowledge age, South Africa is not making the progress it should in creating knowledge work and knowledge workers. At the same time, we’re stuck with a legacy of many millions of people who simply aren’t equipped to get or hold a job in the information age. And we have a basic education system which has been labeled a toxic mess, and which will not produce those workers—perhaps for decades.

The bottom line is that for all the promises, plans, and grand intentions that fly about, we’ll struggle to grow this economy as fast as we must to lift people out of poverty and create a better life for all.

Which brings me to the critical point.

A few months back, Johnny Steinberg wrote an article in Business Day in which he commented on a UCT study of young people in three communities around Cape Town. He noted especially how very hopeful they were of a bright future. This, in the face of the harsh reality that most will be disappointed, frustrated, and deeply angered by their inability to ever escape their lives of perhaps not-so-quiet desperation.

Then about two weeks ago, Brian Whittaker, the Chief Executive of the Business Trust, picked up on that article, and in an article of his own in the same paper said this:

“… leaders are going to have to build a shared understanding of where we want to go as a nation and lead their constituencies to places they would not go on their own.

“For business leadership, this means coming to terms with the fact that the building of a prosperous nation requires simultaneous attention to growth inequality and poverty.”

And he posed this question: “…if we expect those who have the least to defer their demand for a better life, what will those of us who have prospered in this land give in return?”

What indeed? This is the big question—our elephant in the room. The Development Indicators report released last week by the Presidency  paints a disappointing picture of our fight against poverty. As Professor Haroon Bhorat commented, South Africa is “the most consistently unequal society in the world.”

The 2009 Budget Review reports that government spending on social protection shot up from R72.3bn in 2005/06 to R118.1bn this year. About 13.4 million people rely on grants. We are entrenching dependence, poverty, inequality, and exclusion.

Pre-empting other commentators, I ended my 2004 article by saying, “As a matter of extreme urgency, leaders in all sectors need to consider not just how to create jobs, but also how to deal with a society in which expectations are high and jobs do not come. There are dangers ahead, and we are denying them.”

So back to my question: what are you going to do to make a difference in this world? This should be the question that keeps you awake at night.

Many years ago, Marshall McLuhan, a famous media expert, coined the term “global village.” In his book, Understanding Media, which became a best-seller long before anyone imagined the Internet and cellphones, he made the point that courtesy of new media “none of us can any longer think of ourselves as passengers on Spaceship Earth; all of us are crew.” And so it is with Spaceship South Africa—all of us are crew.

You are among the fortunate few, educated to succeed in a modern economy.  You are our best and brightest, our hope for the future. The choice now is whether to be just another passenger on Spaceship South Africa … or one of the crew.

 

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  •  28/02/2012